The Radiofrequency Awareness Committee develops best practices procedures and guidelines to assist workers and management in understanding the steps that need to be taken by those working in close proximity to wireless antennas. This includes identifying which personal RF monitors conform to exposure standards and clarifying rooftop antenna signage requirements.

Committee Lead

Sam Fadlallah, Rogers

UPDATED: April, 2018

Volunteers from STAC’s RF Awareness Committee have developed a best practice document that will help inform and remind users of important background information and safety tips about using personal RF monitors.

This document was published in March, 2017 after receiving verification and approval by the STAC RF Awareness Committee and the STAC Steering Committee.

Please note that STAC volunteers also completed in April 2018 a companion document, STAC Identifying & Responding to RF Hot Zones (Best Practices and Guidelines), which provides additional information and safety tips relating to working around RF installations. This document can be downloaded through the “STAC Identifying RF Hot Zones Best Practices” menu below.

Click here to access STAC Personal RF Monitor Best Practices

Project Lead
Neill Harlen, Interfax Systems

Project Volunteers
Sam Fadlallah, Rogers (STAC Committee Lead)
Dan Renaud, Telecon
Dave Ramdeane, Bell
Deanna Spring, WSP
Gregory Gasbarre, Titan AEX
Keith Ranney, Bell
Mathew Koziell, Stantec

Document Index
1. Introduction
2. Benefits and Practical Uses of an RF Monitor
General Benefits for Users
Specific Applications for Users
3. Features of an RF Monitor
4. Using an RF Monitor
Selecting the Right Monitor
Pre-Use Inspection
Wearing a Monitor
Mitigating Potential Damage
Mitigating False Readings
Limitations of Personal Monitors
5. Job-Site Awareness
6. Questions about RF Monitors
Glossary of Terms
Appendix 1: On-the-Body vs. Off-the-Body Monitors
Appendix 2: Commercial Available Safety Code 6 (2015) Compliant Personal RF Monitors
Appendix 3: Pre-Job EMG Assessment Form

UPDATED: April, 2018

Volunteers from STAC’s RF Awareness Committee have developed a best practice document that will help inform and remind users of important background information and safety tips for working around RF emitting equipment.

The document was published in April, 2018 after receiving verification and approval by the STAC RF Awareness Committee and the STAC Steering Committee.

Please note that STAC volunteers also completed a companion document, STAC Personal RF Monitor Best Practices, which provides additional information and safety tips relating to personal RF monitors. This document can be downloaded through the “STAC Personal RF Monitor Best Practices” menu above.

Click here to access STAC Identifying & Responding to RF Hot Zones (Best Practices and Guidelines).

Project Leads
Dan Renaud, Telecon
Deanna Spring, WSP
Sam Fadlallah, Rogers (STAC RF Awareness Committee Lead)

Project Volunteers
Gregory Gasbarre, Titan AEX
Gordon Lyman, eSystem Training Solutions
John McKay, Grundy Telcom Integration
Keith Ranney, Bell
Mathew Koziell, Azimuth Services
Neill Harlen, Interfax Systems
Richard Zhang, Rogers
Nicholas Kyonka, STAC Program Director

Document Index
1. Introduction
Purpose and Scope
Related STAC Documents
2. Introduction to RF
What is RF?
Biological Effects
Safety Code 6
3. Working with RF
Exposure Levels
Precautionary Approach
Standard Job Site Precautions
4. Protective Measures
Personal RF Monitors
Additional or Alternative Protective Measures
5. Identifying RF Hot Zones
Identifying RF Emitting Equipment
Identifying Damage to Equipment
Installing New Equipment
Working on Existing Installations
Exposure Warning Signs
6. Responding to Hot Zones
Post-Exposure Response (Time and Distance)
Reporting
Flagging the Hazard
7. Conclusion
8. Frequently Asked Questions

Appendix 1 – Resources
Appendix 2 – Pre-Job EMF Assessment Form
Glossary

UPDATED: June, 2019

STAC is continuing to consult its members and other industry professionals to provide a list of personal RF monitors that are verified as capable of being calibrated to Safety Code 6 (2015) limits established by Health Canada.

At this time, STAC has received attestations and confirmation that the following devices have valid calibration verification certificates relevant to the Canadian market:
Nardalert S3
Narda RadMan 2LT (8 GHz), SC6 (2015)
Narda RadMan 2XT (60 GHz), SC6 (2015)
FieldSENSE 2.0
EME Guard XS-SC6
EME Guard XS 40 GHz (SC6)
WaveMon Broadband-8-SC6
WaveMon RF-40-SC6

Note that this does not mean that other monitors cannot be calibrated to Safety Code 6 (2015) limits.

Project Lead
Dave Ramdeane, Bell

Project Volunteers
Clay Parchewsky, WesTower
Dan Renaud, Telecon
Keith Ranney, Bell
Sam Fadlallah, Rogers

A: Neither Safety Code 6 or Industry Canada guidelines provide a minimum antenna height requirement. Antennas can be installed at any height providing they follow Industry Canada requirements which states it be operated in a manner which complies with Health Canada’s Safety Code 6 limits.